events calendar : Victoria Crime at HKU

event

Mar15

March 15, 2016 from 10:30 AM to 18:15 PM

Victoria Crime at HKU

“Victoria Crime” Co-presented by Artify Gallery and the Department of Sociology, HKU

A Joint Exhibition by Artists Eiffel Chong, David Jasper Wong, Steffi Wong, and Dragon Ken

 

Celebrating 30 years of Criminology at HKU, Artify Gallery and the Department of Sociology of The University of Hong Kong will co-present a special exhibition on art and crime. This is a joint exhibition by four artists: acclaimed Malaysian photographer Eiffel Chong, Hong Kong print-maker David Jasper Wong and local newcomers Steffi Wong and Dragon Ken from 15 March to 28 March, 2016 at MC³@702 Creative Space at The University of Hong Kong. The highly innovative exhibition will showcase artworks of these artists with the theme of real Hong Kong crime stories in a dynamic and creative way.


About the Exhibition

Inspired by these real crime stories of Hong Kong, Eiffel Chong exhibits photographic works inspired by the recent Tai Kok Tsui killings; David Jasper Wong explores the 1982 gruesome Jars Murderer in his prints. Dragon Ken’s paintings strive to replicate the infamous Hello Kitty Head murder in 1999 and the digital drawings of Steffi Wong stem from the notorious killing of an expatriate man by his wife. Victoria Crime showcases sensitive and striking works by these four artists, who provoke the viewers to confront inner human turmoil, the motivations of murder and bring to light the dark side of mankind. 

“Tai Kok Tsui Killings, 2013” by Eiffel Chong

Old wedding photographs from the 1950s are collected and examined by Eiffel Chong in this photographic series. The once jovial memories depicted in these images were destroyed and decayed due to humidity and time. Through his lens, Chong captures a distorted perspective of these affectionate wedding photographs as grotesque portraits of a once happy couple. These images parallel and portray the changes in the killer’s relationship with his family and his misunderstanding of their love. 

“The Jars Murderer, 1982” by David Jasper Wong

David Jasper Wong’s artworks are inspired by the nefarious figure of taxi driver Lam Kor-wan, who murdered four female victims. He was named The Jars Murderer because he stored his victims’ body parts and sexual organs in jars. Wong’s works, which are abstract-expressionist in style, show the chilling profile of the killer. Wong weaves together notions of illusion, hallucination and delusion in order to illustrate the progression of the killer’s abhorrent behaviour. His four works, which are entitled Sex, Kill, Video, Film, encapsulate each stage of the killer’s disreputable conduct. 

“Milkshake Murderess, 2003” by Steffi Wong

Steffi Wong employs the technical method of digital drawings to illustrate alluring portraiture with gothic undertones. Her work was inspired by an American murderess, who served her husband a poisonous strawberry milkshake and sedatives before bludgeoning him to death and storing his corpse in a carpet. Steffi Wong chronicles the narrative of this murder in her four artworks. The artist uses food as the focal point in her drawings; highlighting them as the subject of each piece and their relationship with the human characters she depicts. In this series, the public are taken to the crime scene and through the picture plane to experience the intimate environment with the killer and her victim. 

“Hello Kitty Head Murderers, 1999” by Dragon Ken

Dragon Ken re-creates the perverse story of the Hello Kitty Head Murder from March 1999, where three Hong Kong gangsters murdered a young female victim. Dragon Ken’s surreal paintings aspire to present the contradictions in human unconsciousness, such as the conflicting notions of good and evil, past and future, life and afterlife. Greedy desire for the materialistic world is portrayed through the almost lifeless eyes of the figures, whereby money and power are highly sought after. Audiences are connected to the figures Dragon Ken depicts, as the characters’ painted dull eyes are windows looking into the complex inner worlds of human beings. The artist believes that his paintings reflect society, where elements of violence and insecurity are very much prevalent.

 

“Victoria Crime” Joint Exhibition

Date:                            15 March – 28 March, 2016

Venue:                         MC³@702 Creative Space

                                    7/F, The Jockey Club Tower, Centennial Campus, HKU

Opening Hours:           10:30am – 6:15pm (Closed on 16 Mar, Sundays and public holidays)

Admission:                  Free

Enquiry:                                  

Artify Gallery:

Tel.: (852) 3543 1260

E-mail: info@artifygallery.com

The Department of Sociology, HKU:

Tel.: (852) 3917 2309

E-mail: socimccc@hku.hk

 

Opening Ceremony

Date:                            17 March, 2016          

Time:                            18:00 – 20:00